Vandewater, E., Lee, J., & Shim, M. (2005, February). Family Conflict and Violent Electronic Media Use in School-Aged Children. Media Psychology, 7(1), 73-86. Retrieved July 15, 2009, doi:10.1207/S1532785XMEP0701_4

Using a national sample of children aged 6 to 12 (N = 1,075), this study examined the relative merits of 3 theoretical perspectives on the relation between family conflict and children’s use of electronic media (television and electronic games with violent content): (a) the family context hypothesis, whereby family conflict is positively related to violent electronic media use because family tensions will be reflected in children’s interest in media with violent content; (b) the reaction hypothesis, whereby family conflict is positively related to nonviolent media use because children seek out nonviolent media content as a reaction against conflict in their family environment; and (c) the escape hypothesis, whereby family conflict is positively related to total electronic media use because children use media to escape family conflict regardless of content. Results supported the family context hypothesis. There was no support for the reaction and escape hypotheses. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2008 APA, all rights reserved)(from the journal abstract)