Valencia, R. (2008). Violent thought and behavior among juvenile populations: Football players, video game players, and gang members. Dissertation Abstracts International: Section B: The Sciences and Engineering, Vol 69(5-B), 2008. pp. 3282. Retrieved June 24, 2009, from PsycINFO database.

The present dissertation studied the relationship between frequency of violent thought and frequency of violent behavior, as well as the similarities and differences among these variables between high school football players, video game players, and gang members. Self-report data was collected from 61 rural high school students, and correlational analyses demonstrated a strong positive relationship among the frequency of violent thought and violent behavior among the students. The implication of this finding is explored in the present study. The researcher was ultimately limited in his ability to analyze the relationship between the study groups due to a restricted sample population. An analysis of variance produced one significant finding, that video game players have significantly greater frequencies of violent thoughts than the control group. Theoretical basis for this dynamic, as well as possible explanations for the lack of significance found on other measures are also explored in the present study. The findings yielded in the present research have implications for the fields of violence risk assessment and social psychology. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2009 APA, all rights reserved)