Treadwell, K. (2007). The impact of exposure to violent music on undergraduate college males’ state anger, affective, physiological, and aggressive behavioral action responses. Dissertation Abstracts International: Section B: The Sciences and Engineering, Vol 68(1-B), 2007. pp. 673. Retrieved July 3, 2009, from PsycINFO database.

The current study addresses the potential negative impact of exposure to violent lyrical music on West Virginia University undergraduate college males’ state anger, affective, physiological and aggressive behavioral action responses. In addition, relationships between the following variables were also examined: (a) level of trait anger and aggressive behavioral action responses, (b) level of trait anger control and aggressive behavioral action responses, (c) level of trait anger expression and aggressive behavioral action responses, (d) overall anger expression index and aggressive behavioral action responses, (e) daily music listening and aggressive behavioral action responses, and (f) prior music exposure and aggressive behavioral action responses. Music preference influence on aggressive behavioral action responses was also explored. Parametric and nonparametric procedures were utilized to test the research questions. The results of the study revealed that college males exposed to violent lyrical music and subsequently provoked report more aggressive behavioral action responses compared to no music (control) participants. No significant difference in number of aggressive behavioral action responses were found between the violent lyrical and non-violent lyrical groups. Exposure to both violent lyrical and non-violent lyrical music did not impact participants level of state anger or positive and negative affective responses. A significant positive correlation between total number of aggressive behavioral action responses and trait anger was indicated for the violent lyrical participants. No significant between group differences in systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and heart rate (HR) responses were found among the violent lyrical, non-violent lyrical and no music participants. Yet, upon comparing baseline SBP and post-music SBP, within group differences were revealed among both violent lyrical and non-violent lyrical participants. Clinical implications and limitations are discussed as well as suggestions for future research. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2008 APA, all rights reserved)