Singer, M. I., Slovak, K., Frierson, T., & York, P. (1998). Viewing preferences, symptoms of psychological trauma, and violent behaviors among children who watch television. Journal of American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 37 (10), 1041-1048.

Abstract:  Examined the extent to which children’s television-viewing practices are associated with symptoms of psychological trauma and aggressive behaviors. The following 3 hypotheses were tested: (1) children who report watching greater amounts of television per day will report higher levels of trauma symptoms than children who report lesser amounts of television viewing; (2) children who report watching greater amounts of television per day will report higher levels of violent behaviors than children who report watching lesser amounts of television per day; and (3) children who report a preference for action and fighting programs will report higher levels of violent behaviors than children who report a preference for other types of television programs. The study used a survey design in which an anonymous self-report questionnaire was administered to students in grades 3 through 8 in 2,245). All 3 = 11 Ohio public schools during the 1995-1996 school year (N hypotheses were supported. Heavy television viewing by children may indicate the presence of problems such as depression, anxiety, and violent behaviors; such viewing should be screened for by psychiatrists and other mental health professionals working with children. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2004 APA, all rights reserved)