Brown, T.J., Summer, K.E., & Nocera, R. (2002). Understanding sexual aggression against women: An examination of the role of men’s athletic participation and related variables. Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 17 (9), 937-952.

Abstract: Data from 139 college men who participated in and viewed contact (e.g., ice hockey) and noncontact (e.g., tennis) sports at different rates of frequency were examined to determine if there was a relationship between these variables and level of sexual aggression against women. The authors also examined whether attitudes toward women, fraternity membership, and sports ideology were related to sexual aggression against women. Hierarchical regression analysis indicated that attitudes toward women, fraternity membership, and viewing contact sports were significant predictors of sexual aggression against women, with high scores on these variables forecasting higher levels of sexual aggression against women. In addition, low scores on men’s contact sports participation significantly forecasted higher levels of sexual aggression against women. Suggestions for future research in this area are discussed and implications of the results for the socialization of fraternity members and other males are considered. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2004 APA, all rights reserved)